Author Archives: Andrei Pogorilowski

About Andrei Pogorilowski

André Pogoriloffsky is the pen name used by Andrei Covaciu-Pogorilowski for his book "The music of the Temporalists". He was born in Bucharest, Romania, in February 1968. Starting with 1982, he studied music independently, helped by several private professors. In 1989 A.P. started to hear in his head a strange yet beautiful music that he was unable to notate. Short excerpts were presented on the piano to his musician friends who confirmed that the temporal fabric of that music could not be rendered satisfactorily with help from the traditional, bar-rhythmical, semiography. Between that point and 1994, A.P. tried to formulate a theory and a notation for that music, the first result being his first published book - "Energies of musical time - essential studies of pulsatory functionalism" (ARARAT Publishing House, Bucharest, bilingual edition Romanian/English, ISBN 973-96682-0-8). In the late '90s, A.P. discovered cognitive musicology and started to merge his own discoveries with the bulk of scientific contributions from this interdisciplinary domain. After abandoning several approaches, the final result was his last book "The music of the Temporalists". The author is currently living in his hometown, Bucharest, along with his wife Simona and his twelve years old daughter Ina.

The sounds of a different world. Review of „The Music of the Temporalists“ by André Pogorillofsky.

http://blogs.nmz.de/badblog/2016/10/01/the-sounds-of-a-different-world-review-of-the-music-of-the-temporalists-by-andre-pogorillofsky/cover Temporalists NEW.jpg

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The music of the Temporalists

Bibliolore

The music of the Temporalists

In The music of the Temporalists by Andrei Covaciu-Pogorilowski (Charleston: Create space, 2011), a Parisian drugstore owner and amateur pianist experiences a two-year mental trip as an avatar in a parallel (Temporalist) world in which music is cultivated as the art of time rather than the art of sound.

There he meets a musicologist called Jean-Philippe and an old psychologist, Herr Sch…; they teach him all they can about their musical theory and its cognitive aspects so he can transmit what he has learned to his own music culture.

Within this imaginary frame an alternative to the classical bar-rhythm theory is proposed, based on an empirical study of key phenomena of temporal discretization, including entrainment, chunking, subjective accentuation, pulsatory inertia, and temporal gap perception.

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